Why Telling Your Children They Are Smart Could Turn Them Into Cheaters

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I am not one of those parents who believes kids should win trophies just for showing up for their t-ball games. But I’m also not stingy in praising my children when they do well. When my kids got hundreds on their grade school spelling tests, I told them how proud I was of their accomplishment.

But could praise like this turn our children into cheaters?

I’m thinking specifically about praise for ability rather than for effort. When children do well and we tell them how smart they are, are we making them feel pressure to cut corners to hold on to their “smart” identity?

(To read the rest of the article, please visit Forbes.)

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