Category Archives: Behavioral Economics and Public Policy

Colon Cancer Screening Controversy. Here’s What All The Debate Is About.

Here’s what most medical experts agree on: People 50 and older should be screened for colon cancer. Here’s what is more controversial: Whether that screening should start, routinely, at age 45. Recently, the American Cancer Society (ACS) recommended that colon … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioral Economics and Public Policy

How Great HIV Medicines Are Now (In Two Pictures)

In 1991, I remember where I was walking when I learned that Magic Johnson was HIV positive. I shuffled along in a daze, distraught at the thought of such a young and magnificent man facing imminent death. Back then, you see, … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioral Economics and Public Policy

Physician Burnout — These Characters Are To Blame

Physician burnout in the U.S. is reaching epidemic levels, affecting the majority of physicians in some specialties. Practicing medicine is, of course, a stressful job. Make a mistake and you might end someone’s life. But physicians are not usually burned out … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioral Economics and Public Policy

Hospital Price Transparency

The US is finally making very small strides towards pulling healthcare prices out of the shadows. Here is a recent media story on the topic. U.S. hospitals are now required to list the prices of medical services online and update … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioral Economics and Public Policy

Christmas Shopping Tip — Your Brain Knows What You Like Better Than You Do

A song comes through your earbuds: good rhythm, clever lyrics, pleasing melody. You know whether you like the song, right? Maybe not. A series of studies using brain imaging raise the possibility that sometimes we think we like or dislike things, … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioral Economics and Public Policy

The Insurance Companies That Are Most Likely To Refuse To Pay Doctors

Healthcare reimbursement in the U.S. is frighteningly complex. We have federal payers, like Medicare; state/federal payers, like Medicaid; private, for-profit insurance companies, like Aetna; private, not for profit insurers, like many local Blue Cross Blue Shield networks. Oh yes, and … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioral Economics and Public Policy, Health Policy

Why Telling Your Children They Are Smart Could Turn Them Into Cheaters

I am not one of those parents who believes kids should win trophies just for showing up for their t-ball games. But I’m also not stingy in praising my children when they do well. When my kids got hundreds on … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioral Economics and Public Policy

What Socialized Medicine Would Mean for Your Health

Americans are not fans of socialized medicine. Sure, some people want socialized healthcare payment, including many people who are fans of Medicare for All. But even most Bernie Sanders supporters probably aren’t in favor of socializing the entire U.S. healthcare … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioral Economics and Public Policy, Health Policy

A Moderate Republican Plan To Fix American Healthcare: ‘Medicare For All’?

Everyone thinks of “Medicare for All” as a liberal idea, an extremely liberal one embraced by the socialist wing of the Democratic Party. It’s an idea Democrats were hesitant to embrace in the Obama era, for being too far out … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioral Economics and Public Policy, Health Policy

Do We Know How to Promote Employee Health?

According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, lots of companies are encouraging workers to get biometric screening.  Here’s a picture of that: But is there evidence that this promotes healthier behavior? Would love someone to direct me to any relevant research.

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