Category Archives: Behavioral Economics and Public Policy

Has Obamacare Made Restaurants Partisan?

Politics in the US is discouragingly partisan. National politics has become increasingly partisan since at least the late ’60s, when the passage of civil rights legislation influenced many conservative southern Democrats to join the Republican Party. Even state politics has become more … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioral Economics and Public Policy, Political Psychology | Tagged ,

Calorie Counts on… Stairs? Interesting Nudge

Just came across an interesting way to try to motivate people to exert themselves: post calories-burned-counts on the stairs. Would that work for you?  For me, it would probably make me look down while walking up, only to trip, fall … Continue reading

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A Simple Nudge That Will Improve Medical Care for People with Diabetes

When patients with diabetes come to the doctor’s office, it is important for their clinicians to take a look at their feet. Many, if not most, foot amputations among people with diabetes would be prevented with this simple exam, an … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioral Economics and Public Policy, Medical Decision Making | Tagged ,

Provocative Piece On Behavioral Economics And Public Policy

The Financial Times, one of the great newspapers of the world, recently published a really nice essay exploring some of the controversies about what role, if any, behavioral economics should play in public policy. I’m going to give you a … Continue reading

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How Charlie Brown Prevents Traffic Accidents

Check out this wonderful street art, that seconds as a behavioral intervention to reduce traffic speed: Very cool! (Click here to view comments) Bookmark on Delicious Digg this post Recommend on Facebook Buzz it up share via Reddit Share with … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioral Economics and Public Policy, Miscellaneous | Tagged

The Mistake of Selling Your Car When It Reaches 50,001 Miles

You might think that the difference between a car that has been driven 49,999 miles and one that has been driven 50,001 miles is… 2 miles. But you would miss out on another big difference – in the price a … Continue reading

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Careful When You Come Up For Parole

Parole boards are supposed to objectively assess whether inmates eligible for parole deserve to be released from prison before the end of their sentence. They need to determine whether people are reformed, whether they have been behaving themselves in prison, … Continue reading

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Malpractice Reform Could Benefit Patients More Than Doctors

The U.S. medical malpractice system is broken. It frequently does not punish doctors who need punishing, while levying fines against doctors who did nothing wrong. And this dreadfully inaccurate system still manages to take almost five years, on average, to … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioral Economics and Public Policy, Health Policy | Tagged

A Clever Nudge to Reduce Waste of Natural Resources

I teach a course on behavioral economics and public policy at Duke University. One of my former students recently emailed me a picture of a bill he received in the mail. It looks like conEdison is trying to remind him … Continue reading

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The Growing Importance of Behavioral Economics in Retirement Saving Plans

Dick Thaler, an economist who helped create the field of behavioral economics, came up with a wonderful idea a long time ago to promote retirement savings, a plan he calls Save More Tomorrow. Among the many clever aspects of his … Continue reading

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