Category Archives: Health Policy

Podcast on Healthcare.gov 3.0

The Managing Editor of the New England Journal of Medicine interviewed me about the piece I wrote, with David Comerford and Eric Johnson, on redesigning the health insurance exchanges. For those of you with long commutes, here is that podcast: … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioral Economics and Public Policy, Health Policy | Tagged , ,

More on Healthcare.gov 3.0

Here is a nice follow-up story on my recent New England Journal article on improving the design of health insurance exchanges. Comparing health insurance plans – whether signing up through Healthcare.gov or weighing employer-sponsored plans with a spouse – can … Continue reading

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Healthcare.gov 3.0–Improving the Design of the Obamacare Exchanges

I joined two other, much smarter, colleagues in calling for the use of behavioral economics and decision psychology to improve the design of the websites people use to purchase health insurance in the U.S. That article came out today in … Continue reading

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Proven: People Don’t Take Medicine They Can’t Afford

Cholesterol pills are one of the great medical advances I’ve witnessed during my professional career. I am talking specifically about a category of medications called statins, drugs like Lipitor and Pravachol. These drugs have prevented probably hundreds of thousands of … Continue reading

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You Thought Innovation Was Hard, How about De-Innovation?

David Asch and I recently published an article in Health Affairs on the challenge of getting healthcare practitioners to stop doing things they are accustomed to doing, even when the evidence that those things are harmful becomes overwhelming. Here is … Continue reading

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Sneaky Way to End Run the FDA?

In an earlier post, I wrote about the dietary supplements industry, which is largely unregulated by the FDA, to the detriment of the American consumer. Well here is a recent news story showing how a company is looking to take … Continue reading

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Is Healthcare Spending About To Accelerate?

Bend a resilient object and it will spring back with a vengeance once released from your grip. Is that what is about to happen to healthcare spending? For years now, experts have been debating ways to “bend the cost curve … Continue reading

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How Generously Does Your State Reimburse for Medicaid?

A while ago, I wrote a post on how hard it can be for Medicaid recipients to get medical appointments, because so many physicians limit the number of Medicaid patients they see. They limit the number because Medicaid reimbursement is … Continue reading

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Malpractice Reform Won’t Save Money

Two problems loom large over the American medical care system. First, we spend outrageous amounts of money on healthcare, with too many patients receiving too many services at too high a price. Second, our malpractice system is an international embarrassment, … Continue reading

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Should North Carolina Expand Medicaid?

My home state of North Carolina is one of a number of states that refused to expand Medicaid, even though the Affordable Care Act stipulates that the federal government will cover the majority of expenses associated with such expansion. Here … Continue reading

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