Category Archives: Political Psychology

Has Obamacare Made Restaurants Partisan?

Politics in the US is discouragingly partisan. National politics has become increasingly partisan since at least the late ’60s, when the passage of civil rights legislation influenced many conservative southern Democrats to join the Republican Party. Even state politics has become more … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioral Economics and Public Policy, Political Psychology | Tagged ,

Polarized

I recently reread a very informative New Yorker article by Ryan Lizza, called the Obama memos. I have assigned the article to my undergraduate health policy class, to help them understand the political climate surrounding the passage of The Affordable … Continue reading

Posted in Health Policy, Political Psychology | Tagged

The Cost of Saying No to Medicaid Expansion

Here is a nice picture, from a HuffPo article , showing how much money states are losing by not expanding Medicaid in accordance with the Affordable Care Act: Not a small change, by any measure. Shows how much it means … Continue reading

Posted in Health Policy, Political Psychology | Tagged , ,

Cass Sunstein Takes on the Death Panel Myth

I wrote a while back about some research I conducted with Jason Reifler and Brendan Nyhan on how fact checking influences people’s belief in whether Obamacare created death panels, to decide which old or disabled peoples to kill.  Yesterday, Cass … Continue reading

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The Ideal President: Someone Who Isn’t Running for Office?

In 1895, Teddy Roosevelt was asked if he was hoping some day to be President.  He flew off in a rage.  Part of his rant is revealing, and might have helped Mitt Romney if he’d come across this quote earlier … Continue reading

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Why It Is So Difficult to Kill the Death Panel Myth

In August of 2009, Sarah Palin claimed that the health legislation being crafted by Democrats at the time would create a “death panel,” in which government bureaucrats would decide whether disabled and elderly patients are “worthy of healthcare.” Despite being … Continue reading

Posted in Health Policy, Political Psychology | Tagged , , ,

Why people hate health reform

Here is a link to an Op-Ed I wrote with two colleagues at Duke, in which we provide a novel explanation for why so many Americans hate Obamacare. Continue reading

Posted in Health Policy, Political Psychology

Peter’s Partisan Podcast: Pretty Powerful . . . Ah, I ran out of “P” words

Check out a podcast I made with GovLoop, a website for government employees, in which I discuss the challenge we face in this country of overcoming partisanship.  Take a listen and let me know what you think. Bookmark on Delicious … Continue reading

Posted in Political Psychology

Dying for Facts: Conclusion

In the last few posts, I’ve told the story of a couple heated debates. One still ongoing: “Does capital punishment deter criminals?” Another ended: “Do antiarrythmia drugs save lives?” The latter debate is over because people on both sides of … Continue reading

Posted in Political Psychology

Dying for Facts Part 4: Getting Evidence!

When I last posted to this site, I was recounting my experience as a medical resident in the late 80s, presumably saving my patients’ lives with wonder drugs. A few weeks into my cardiology rotation, the senior cardiologist who had … Continue reading

Posted in Political Psychology