Tag Archives: behavioral economics

Is Peer Pressure to Increase Physician Performance Overrated?

Shutterstock It has become trendy in health policy circles to believe that behavioral economic interventions are the key to health system improvement. After all, traditional economic interventions like pay per performance have generated underwhelming results, with little or no change … Continue reading

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Smaller plates, less food

If you use a smaller plate when you eat, you’ll eat less food. Here’s a rather wonky summary of research on plate size, a “meta-analysis” showing that smaller plates mean you put less food on the plate and, thus, eat … Continue reading

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Graphic Cigarette Labels Work!

Warning – the warning labels pictured below are graphic but, according to a recent study, they increase the chances that people will quit smoking. Now we need to find a way to get legal permission to use such pictures, so … Continue reading

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Do We Know How to Promote Employee Health?

According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, lots of companies are encouraging workers to get biometric screening.  Here’s a picture of that: But is there evidence that this promotes healthier behavior? Would love someone to direct me to any relevant research.

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What Will It Take to Keep People from Gaining Weight?

Losing weight is hard. And keeping it off once you’ve lost it–that’s probably even harder. Just ask Oprah. So maybe those of us who are overweight or obese should simply focus on not gaining more weight than we’ve already gained. … Continue reading

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Best Nudge Ever?

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Behavioral Science of Eating (in One Picture!)

The Journal of the Association for Consumer Research (yes, there is such a thing!) had an outstanding issue dedicated to eating behavior recently. Here is a picture from that issue worth sharing:  

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How Money Makes Us Behave (The Good and Bad)

Money can undermine our morals.  If you don’t believe me, look what happened to a group of four-through-six-year-olds who were brought in for a simple experiment. Researchers asked them to sort objects from a box. Half sorted coins, and half … Continue reading

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Do Luxury Brands Benefit from Income Inequality?

I like to think that despite being wealthier than most Americans, I remain immune to materialistic desires. I drive a 17-year-old Honda Accord and wouldn’t know designer clothes if you wrapped me in them, head to toe. But it turns … Continue reading

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Warning: Bicycle Helmets Could Be Hazardous for Your Health

A bicycle helmet prevented me from experiencing a major head injury. But did it promote the very behavior that caused me to crash my bike? It was autumn in Michigan, and I was riding my mountain bike along a lakeside … Continue reading

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