Tag Archives: behavioral economics

Calorie Counts on… Stairs? Interesting Nudge

Just came across an interesting way to try to motivate people to exert themselves: post calories-burned-counts on the stairs. Would that work for you?  For me, it would probably make me look down while walking up, only to trip, fall … Continue reading

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A Simple Nudge That Will Improve Medical Care for People with Diabetes

When patients with diabetes come to the doctor’s office, it is important for their clinicians to take a look at their feet. Many, if not most, foot amputations among people with diabetes would be prevented with this simple exam, an … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioral Economics and Public Policy, Medical Decision Making | Tagged ,

Provocative Piece On Behavioral Economics And Public Policy

The Financial Times, one of the great newspapers of the world, recently published a really nice essay exploring some of the controversies about what role, if any, behavioral economics should play in public policy. I’m going to give you a … Continue reading

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How Charlie Brown Prevents Traffic Accidents

Check out this wonderful street art, that seconds as a behavioral intervention to reduce traffic speed: Very cool! (Click here to view comments) Bookmark on Delicious Digg this post Recommend on Facebook Buzz it up share via Reddit Share with … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioral Economics and Public Policy, Miscellaneous | Tagged

Careful When You Come Up For Parole

Parole boards are supposed to objectively assess whether inmates eligible for parole deserve to be released from prison before the end of their sentence. They need to determine whether people are reformed, whether they have been behaving themselves in prison, … Continue reading

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Why I’m Not Sad That I Can’t Fly

I remember one time having a conversation with Daniel Kahneman, one of the founders of behavioral economics, about the topic of happiness and emotional adaptation, in the context of chronic disability. We were discussing emotional impact of experiencing a limb … Continue reading

Posted in Health & Well-being, Miscellaneous | Tagged ,

A Clever Nudge to Reduce Waste of Natural Resources

I teach a course on behavioral economics and public policy at Duke University. One of my former students recently emailed me a picture of a bill he received in the mail. It looks like conEdison is trying to remind him … Continue reading

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Predicting Adaptation to Calamity and Disability

People often show an amazing ability to emotionally recover from difficult circumstances. I devoted my second book, You’re Stronger Than You Think, to this topic. Now comes some really cool research, showing that people’s ability to bounce back from adversity … Continue reading

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The Growing Importance of Behavioral Economics in Retirement Saving Plans

Dick Thaler, an economist who helped create the field of behavioral economics, came up with a wonderful idea a long time ago to promote retirement savings, a plan he calls Save More Tomorrow. Among the many clever aspects of his … Continue reading

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Stopping Unhealthy Eating with a Traffic Light

In a recently published article, a team of researchers showed that a simple graphical cue, showing people which foods are healthy and unhealthy, significantly improve their eating behaviors. Here is a nice summary of the study results, as summarized on … Continue reading

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