Tag Archives: behavioral economics

Is It Irrational For Carmelo Anthony To Take So Many Three Pointers?

A jab to the right, then Carmelo steps back behind the three-point line and launches a shot. It clanks off the back of the rim. How likely is he to be the next person on his team to attempt a … Continue reading

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Emotional Adaptation and Desire

I’ve done a fair amount of research on how people emotionally adapt to life circumstances. My research is mainly in the context of illness and disability, where people bounce back from adversity more than expected. But people can also emotionally … Continue reading

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Side Effect Warnings Can Increase Pharmaceutical Sales

I must not be the only person to wonder how pharmaceutical companies succeed with direct to consumer advertisements when, stuck in the middle of all their TV ads, are those long lists of side effects. You know what I mean. … Continue reading

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How to Make People Interested in What You Have to Say

In his book, To Save Everything, Click Here, Evgeny Morozov tells a story about a PR agent who was trying to create some buzz around a topic. No one seemed interested. And then the agent had an idea: “I dashed … Continue reading

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Can Circular Reasoning Make You Rich?

We Americans are notoriously bad at saving money.  While people in Germany, Sweden and even France save about 10% of the money they make, folks in the U.S. save closer to 3 or 4% of their earnings.  With so little … Continue reading

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Interesting Take on Why We Often Perceive Handsome Men to Be Jerks

I just came across an interesting article in Slate contending that we often perceive handsome men to be jerks because examples of jerky handsome men come more easily to mind than examples of jerky plain men. In the case of single … Continue reading

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Why Desserts Are Irresistible

It all comes down to willpower, right?  Strength of purpose.  Muster the resolve to skip dessert, and you have a shot at losing that spare tire hanging off your belly.  Succumb to your temptations, however, and you are simply being … Continue reading

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A Clever Way to Promote Recycling

Behavioral science has taught me that subtle environmental cues can have a surprisingly strong influence on people. I don’t know if the following cue was purposeful or not, but the relative size of these two receptacles – the blue one … Continue reading

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What Marathon Runners Have in Common with Used Car Salesmen

In recent posts, I’ve presented several interesting pictures of how arbitrary thresholds influence behavior. I showed how airplane pilots speed up flights to make on-time arrivals, but don’t speed up late flights that won’t make it on time. I’ve shown that … Continue reading

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Self-Delusion at the Neighborhood Bar

According to a Gallup Poll, 1 in 4 people who are dependent on alcohol (they scored 20 or more on the World Health Organization’s Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test — AUDIT) think their drinking is average or less average. It … Continue reading

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