Tag Archives: books I’ve been reading

The Availability Heuristic

As someone who has been working in the field of behavioral economics for a couple decades now, I have long been aware of what psychologists call “the availability heuristic.” This was a phenomenon described by Kahneman and Tversky in some … Continue reading

Posted in Miscellaneous | Tagged ,

On Personality and Professions

“An extroverted mathematician, goes an old joke, is one who looks at your feet while he’s talking.” Alex Stone recounts this joke in his book, Fooling Houdini, which I wrote about in a previous post. As a philosophy major, I … Continue reading

Posted in Miscellaneous | Tagged ,

On the Psychology of Magic

Not long ago, I had the pleasure of reading Fooling Houdini, by Alex Stone. It is a marvelous book, part memoir about how his obsession with magic pulled him away from his career in physics, but also a wonderful explanation … Continue reading

Posted in Miscellaneous | Tagged , ,

Paul Samuelson's View of Milton Friedman

In their book Animal Spirits, George Akerlof and Robert Shiller recount the intellectual battles waged between Milton Friedman and Paul Samuelson, two of the 20th century’s most important economists. Friedman was a huge believer in the power of markets, and … Continue reading

Posted in Miscellaneous | Tagged , ,

The Psychology of Entrepreneurial Success

In a recent post, I give you a flavor for Rich Cohen’s wonderful book The Fish That Ate the Whale. One of the things that struck me in reading his book was the psychology of entrepreneurial success. It is often … Continue reading

Posted in Miscellaneous | Tagged ,

Why I'm Bananas Over The Fish That Ate the Whale

Recently I had the pleasure of reading Rich Cohen’s wonderful book: The Fish That Ate the Whale – the Life and Times of America’s Banana King. The book tells the story of Samuel Zemurray, a true rags to riches story, … Continue reading

Posted in Miscellaneous | Tagged ,

On Reading Rick Atkinson's The Day of Battle

I don’t read much war history. I’m fascinated by what causes humans to end up in a state of war, but not so interested in the bloody details of how they fight their battles. Nevertheless, I thoroughly enjoyed The Day … Continue reading

Posted in Miscellaneous | Tagged ,

On the Underutilization of Single Sentence Paragraphs

I have long been a fan of single sentence paragraphs. I really have. When used properly, an occasional one-off sentence can really stand out, amidst the tumble of longer paragraphs made up of complicated sentences. Here’s a good example from … Continue reading

Posted in Miscellaneous | Tagged , ,

On Repetition and Good Writing

In high school, I was taught not to repeat words too often in the same paragraph, or even within a relatively short essay. I know I am not alone in having been taught that way, because many of the people … Continue reading

Posted in Miscellaneous | Tagged , ,

On the Importance of Getting Things Done in Politics

I’m currently in the middle of reading Robert Caro’s first book, The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York. I’ll be blogging intermittently about this wonderful book over the next few weeks. Expect a few of those … Continue reading

Posted in Miscellaneous | Tagged , ,