Tag Archives: obesity

Time To Stop Paying For Pepsi With Food Stamps

The food stamp program helps over 40 million Americans pay for groceries. Unlike other forms of economic assistance, this program, called SNAP (the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program), only pays for food, thereby constraining how recipients make use of the aid. … Continue reading

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My Burrito Has How Many Calories?!?

In collaboration with Peggy Liu and Jim Bettman, I’ve had fun doing some research on just how hard it is for people to guess how many calories they are consuming, at restaurants like Chipotle where everyone puts different ingredients on … Continue reading

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A Park Bench That Tells You You’re Fat?

Clearly we in the United States are not taking the obesity epidemic as seriously as the Russian government. We debate whether it is appropriate for the government to require restaurants to inform their customers about how many calories they are … Continue reading

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Designing a Better Restaurant Menu

My friend and colleague Brian Wansink, from Cornell University, worked with some colleagues to design a preliminary restaurant menu, that maximizes the odds the people will order healthy foods. Trick number one: don’t call them “healthy” foods. Here is an … Continue reading

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Red Robin, Red Robin, Please Clog My Arteries!

A while back, one of my favorite journalists – Sarah Kliff, from Vox – published a picture showing which chain restaurants win the award for offering the highest calorie entrées. I figured it was time to recirculate this gallery of … Continue reading

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Why Desserts Are Irresistible

It all comes down to willpower, right?  Strength of purpose.  Muster the resolve to skip dessert, and you have a shot at losing that spare tire hanging off your belly.  Succumb to your temptations, however, and you are simply being … Continue reading

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More on Burritos and Calories at Chipotle

Sarah Kliff, one of my favorite journalists, had a really nice write up on the burrito study recently published by a wonderful student at Duke, Peggy Liu.  Here is an excerpt from her write up, and a link to the full … Continue reading

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Obesity Is the Future of Chronic Disease

In a recent post, I excoriated athletes like LeBron James and Peyton Manning for endorsing unhealthy junk foods – for fattening their wallets by fattening our population. A recent study in Health Affairs provides a powerful illustration of the future effects of these fatty foods. The study is a rather … Continue reading

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Do You Know How Many Calories Are in Your Burrito?

Here’s a new study I conducted with Peggy Liu, Jim Bettman, and Arianna Uhalde on calorie range information. Check it out below. Liu, Peggy J., James R. Bettman, Arianna R. Uhalde, and Peter A. Ubel (forthcoming), “How Many Calories Are … Continue reading

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Calorie Counts on… Stairs? Interesting Nudge

Just came across an interesting way to try to motivate people to exert themselves: post calories-burned-counts on the stairs. Would that work for you?  For me, it would probably make me look down while walking up, only to trip, fall … Continue reading

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