Tag Archives: obesity

Designing a Better Restaurant Menu

My friend and colleague Brian Wansink, from Cornell University, worked with some colleagues to design a preliminary restaurant menu, that maximizes the odds the people will order healthy foods. Trick number one: don’t call them “healthy” foods. Here is an … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioral Economics and Public Policy | Tagged ,

Red Robin, Red Robin, Please Clog My Arteries!

A while back, one of my favorite journalists – Sarah Kliff, from Vox – published a picture showing which chain restaurants win the award for offering the highest calorie entrées. I figured it was time to recirculate this gallery of … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioral Economics and Public Policy | Tagged ,

Why Desserts Are Irresistible

It all comes down to willpower, right?  Strength of purpose.  Muster the resolve to skip dessert, and you have a shot at losing that spare tire hanging off your belly.  Succumb to your temptations, however, and you are simply being … Continue reading

Posted in Health & Well-being | Tagged ,

More on Burritos and Calories at Chipotle

Sarah Kliff, one of my favorite journalists, had a really nice write up on the burrito study recently published by a wonderful student at Duke, Peggy Liu.  Here is an excerpt from her write up, and a link to the full … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioral Economics and Public Policy | Tagged ,

Obesity Is the Future of Chronic Disease

In a recent post, I excoriated athletes like LeBron James and Peyton Manning for endorsing unhealthy junk foods – for fattening their wallets by fattening our population. A recent study in Health Affairs provides a powerful illustration of the future effects of these fatty foods. The study is a rather … Continue reading

Posted in Health & Well-being | Tagged

Do You Know How Many Calories Are in Your Burrito?

Here’s a new study I conducted with Peggy Liu, Jim Bettman, and Arianna Uhalde on calorie range information. Check it out below. Liu, Peggy J., James R. Bettman, Arianna R. Uhalde, and Peter A. Ubel (forthcoming), “How Many Calories Are … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioral Economics and Public Policy | Tagged , ,

Calorie Counts on… Stairs? Interesting Nudge

Just came across an interesting way to try to motivate people to exert themselves: post calories-burned-counts on the stairs. Would that work for you?  For me, it would probably make me look down while walking up, only to trip, fall … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioral Economics and Public Policy | Tagged ,

Obesity Really DOES Kill

There has been controversy recently about whether obesity is truly bad for people’s health, or in fact whether it might even protect people from early mortality. A study  from the New England Journal in January provides strong evidence that obesity … Continue reading

Posted in Health & Well-being, Health Policy | Tagged

Do Docs Spend More in McAllen, Texas Because People Who Live There Are Obese?

In a very influential 2009 New Yorker essay, Atul Gawande described why health care spending is rampant in McAllen, Texas, an example of the regional variations in healthcare utilization that policy experts at Dartmouth have been studying for years. Indeed, this … Continue reading

Posted in Health Policy | Tagged , ,

Stopping Unhealthy Eating with a Traffic Light

In a recently published article, a team of researchers showed that a simple graphical cue, showing people which foods are healthy and unhealthy, significantly improve their eating behaviors. Here is a nice summary of the study results, as summarized on … Continue reading

Posted in Behavioral Economics and Public Policy | Tagged ,