Tag Archives: obesity

Why Desserts Are Irresistible

It all comes down to willpower, right?  Strength of purpose.  Muster the resolve to skip dessert, and you have a shot at losing that spare tire hanging off your belly.  Succumb to your temptations, however, and you are simply being … Continue reading

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More on Burritos and Calories at Chipotle

Sarah Kliff, one of my favorite journalists, had a really nice write up on the burrito study recently published by a wonderful student at Duke, Peggy Liu.  Here is an excerpt from her write up, and a link to the full … Continue reading

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Obesity Is the Future of Chronic Disease

In a recent post, I excoriated athletes like LeBron James and Peyton Manning for endorsing unhealthy junk foods – for fattening their wallets by fattening our population. A recent study in Health Affairs provides a powerful illustration of the future effects of these fatty foods. The study is a rather … Continue reading

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Do You Know How Many Calories Are in Your Burrito?

Here’s a new study I conducted with Peggy Liu, Jim Bettman, and Arianna Uhalde on calorie range information. Check it out below. Liu, Peggy J., James R. Bettman, Arianna R. Uhalde, and Peter A. Ubel (forthcoming), “How Many Calories Are … Continue reading

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Calorie Counts on… Stairs? Interesting Nudge

Just came across an interesting way to try to motivate people to exert themselves: post calories-burned-counts on the stairs. Would that work for you?  For me, it would probably make me look down while walking up, only to trip, fall … Continue reading

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Obesity Really DOES Kill

There has been controversy recently about whether obesity is truly bad for people’s health, or in fact whether it might even protect people from early mortality. A study  from the New England Journal in January provides strong evidence that obesity … Continue reading

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Do Docs Spend More in McAllen, Texas Because People Who Live There Are Obese?

In a very influential 2009 New Yorker essay, Atul Gawande described why health care spending is rampant in McAllen, Texas, an example of the regional variations in healthcare utilization that policy experts at Dartmouth have been studying for years. Indeed, this … Continue reading

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Stopping Unhealthy Eating with a Traffic Light

In a recently published article, a team of researchers showed that a simple graphical cue, showing people which foods are healthy and unhealthy, significantly improve their eating behaviors. Here is a nice summary of the study results, as summarized on … Continue reading

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Squat for Your Subway Token: One of the Most Creative Nudges I’ve Encountered

This idea is so crazy it might just be the best one I’ve heard all week: a subway station in Moscow provides free tickets to commuters who stand in front of a monitor and squat or lunge 30 times. I … Continue reading

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Media Picking Up My Critique of Lebron James

Inquisitor.com just picked up my recent Forbes post on Lebron James, and ran with it (even though, of course, that is the wrong sports metaphor for me to use). Here is their story on my story: Forbes contributor Peter Ubel calls … Continue reading

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