Is Peer Pressure to Increase Physician Performance Overrated?

Shutterstock

It has become trendy in health policy circles to believe that behavioral economic interventions are the key to health system improvement. After all, traditional economic interventions like pay per performance have generated underwhelming results, with little or no change in physician behavior. Why not try a non-financial, psychological intervention—like performance feedback!

Well, a study conducted in the last couple years in Switzerland raises questions about the effectiveness of such feedback. In the study, researchers randomized physicians to either receive feedback every three months (on how many antibiotics they prescribed compared to their peers), or receive no feedback. They hoped that such feedback would shame over-prescribers into prescribing more parsimoniously. The physicians in the intervention group received a one-page letter every three months, with a nice picture showing them their relative rate of antibiotic prescribing.

(To read the rest of this article, please visit Forbes.)

This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.